Middle River Dispatches is a gumbo of posts about fly-fishing, conservation, politics and days afield.

Chuck Grassley: GOP must back Graham-Cassidy

Even if Graham-Cassidy has flaws, senator says GOP must fulfill promise to repeal Obamacare

Source: Chuck Grassley: GOP must back Graham-Cassidy

Zinke puts ‘Big Buck Hunter’ in Interior Dept cafeteria to promote hunting

Face palm…

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke added a new feature to the Department of the Interior’s cafeteria this week — the “Big Buck Hunter” arcade game.

Source: Zinke puts ‘Big Buck Hunter’ in Interior Dept cafeteria to promote hunting

Opinion | What happens when know-nothings and amateurs hold power

Professionals wanted for top government posts.

Source: Opinion | What happens when know-nothings and amateurs hold power

Mastering the Mouse Retrieve: Learn to Mimic the Movements of a Mouse

Use techniques such as the strip, or the wake and skitter, in order to make lifelike movements with your mouse flies. Read our tips for successful mouse retrieves!

Source: Mastering the Mouse Retrieve: Learn to Mimic the Movements of a Mouse

Shot by Shot: Building a Scene in Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s Vietnam Epic

The filmmakers look at all sides of a battle, and a war, that many Americans, as Mr. Burns put it, “would basically prefer to be about themselves.”

Source: Shot by Shot: Building a Scene in Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s Vietnam Epic

Ken Burns’s American Canon

Even in a fractious era, the filmmaker still believes that his documentaries can bring every viewer in.

Source: Ken Burns’s American Canon

Video Shows Utah Nurse Handcuffed After Refusing to Draw Patient’s Blood

Footage of the episode showed an extended confrontation between the nurse and a police officer during which she screamed, “Somebody help me!”

Source: Video Shows Utah Nurse Handcuffed After Refusing to Draw Patient’s Blood

Opinion | John McCain: It’s time Congress returns to regular order

Our shared values define us more than our differences. Lawmakers should heed that lesson.

We must respect his authority and constitutional responsibilities. We must, where we can, cooperate with him. But we are not his subordinates. We don’t answer to him. We answer to the American people. We must be diligent in discharging our responsibility to serve as a check on his power. And we should value our identity as members of Congress more than our partisan affiliation.

Source: Opinion | John McCain: It’s time Congress returns to regular order

Trump Cabinet member’s daughter rips transgender ban

I like the way she thinks.

Right on shipmate!

Source: Trump Cabinet member’s daughter rips transgender ban

Today’s Outdoor Media

From OWAA News

The outdoor communication industry has a rich history of helping the America people see the outdoors even if they couldn’t get outside themselves.Kids curled up with flashlights and sporting maga­zines under their bed covers. Adults read newspapers in leather chairs while smoking a pipe and enjoying a single malt.

Magazine articles, TV shows and outdoor columns in newspapers, transported Americans into the great outdoors.

Today, OWAA members keep that tradition alive while we, as our missions says, “set the highest ethical and communications standards.”

We bring adventure, great storytelling and enter­tainment into the homes of the public, but even more importantly, outdoor journalists continue to play a criti­cal role in helping the American people see the value in the great outdoors while also calling attention to what threatens it.

The history of outdoor writers calling attention to bad land or wildlife management actions is legendary. Journalist can point out how, without public vigilance, their elected officials will sell that heritage to the highest bidder.

One of the more significant mission tenets of OWAA is “encour­age public enjoyment and conservation of natural resources.”

Outdoor journalists show a simple equation; healthy habitat creates recreation opportunities. And recreation drives significant economic activity. That is a message that resonates in the halls of power and is strong medicine in fighting for the protection of our natural resources.

Our members are the voices that show the world the grandeur of America’s outdoor resources. They are the voices that share the stories — good and bad — of our waters and woods.

Land, fish and wildlife don’t have human voices, so we must be the voice to reach the American people. My job is making sure our members have the tools and opportunities to be a loud and effective voice.

OWAA is comprised of more than 800 individual outdoor communicators covering a broad spectrum of outdoor beats, from shooting to camping, fishing to kayaking and wildlife watching to backpacking. From these diverse backgrounds and disciplines, members gather beneath the OWAA ban­ner to hone skills, share philosophies, develop profitable business strategies and network with peers, conservation policymakers and industry trendsetters.

Eighty-seven years ago the men who started OWAA thought the work they were doing as chroniclers of the great outdoors was important enough to found an organization to perpetuate the craft.

Today, access to public lands is shrinking, habitat loss is increas­ing and environmental issues complex. The work we do today as outdoor journalists is as important, perhaps even more so, then it was back then.